Globalization and Urban Development (Advances in Spatial by Harry W. Richardson, Chang-Hee C. Bae

By Harry W. Richardson, Chang-Hee C. Bae

So much study on globalization has enthusiastic about macroeconomic and economy-wide effects. This e-book explores an under-researched sector, the affects of globalization on towns and nationwide city hierarchies, in particular yet no longer completely in constructing international locations. lots of the globalization-urban study has targeting the "global towns" (e.g. manhattan, London, Paris, Tokyo) that effect what occurs within the remainder of the realm. by contrast, this study seems to be on the towns on the receiving finish of the forces of globalization. the overall discovering is that enormous towns, on stability, take advantage of globalization, even supposing now and again on the rate of widening spatial inequities.

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Vii. Industrial Composition. One of the distinctive features of post-industrial society is a major shift in industrial composition, specifically, a rise in the proportion of the service sector. Service sector employments can be highly footloose (particularly with the development of communications technology), but historically they have been concentrated centrally because of the need for face-to-face contacts and linkages with other businesses. Decentralization of the service sector is quite likely with the advancement in information technology, but some kind of clustering is still possible due to the minimum level of face-to-face contacts required.

Scale economies and diseconomies of cities. There is no clear theoretical or empirical analysis showing that cities are oversized in the sense that the negative benefits of large-scale cities exceed the positive benefits. But there have been many casual observations which show the cost side of urban life. People complain about urban ills, such as pollution, crime, traffic congestion and lack of housing. Probably it is safe to say that the growth of large cities is likely to be slower than in the past.

V. Cultural factors. The central city is historical in many ways. -C. Lim performing arts. As a society becomes more affluent, the demand for and awareness of the value of historical and cultural elements increases. Therefore, even with extremely efficient communications technology, people will travel to the center of urban areas to have first-hand experiences for certain activities, contributing to the tendency for centrality. vi. Scale economies and diseconomies of cities. There is no clear theoretical or empirical analysis showing that cities are oversized in the sense that the negative benefits of large-scale cities exceed the positive benefits.

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