Evolutionary Biology: Volume 2 by Theodosius Dobzhansky (auth.), Theodosius Dobzhansky, Max K.

By Theodosius Dobzhansky (auth.), Theodosius Dobzhansky, Max K. Hecht, William C. Steere (eds.)

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1966. The Bridge of Life. New York, Simon and Schuster. SLOBODKIN, L. B. 1964. The strategy of evolution. Amer. , 52:342-357. SMART, J. C. 1963. Physics and biology. In Philosophy and Scientific Realism. New York, Humanities Press. 34 Evolufionary Biology STEBBINS, G. L. 1966. Processes of Organic Evolution. , Prentice-Hall. TEILHARD DE CHARDIN, P. 1959. The Phenomenon of Man. New York, Harper. THODAY, J. M. 1953. Components of fitness. Sympos. Soc. Exp. , 7:96-113. - - - . 1958. Natural selection and biological progress.

The reduction of eyes and pigment in animals living in perpetual darkness has been eagerly seized upon by Lamarckians and Neolamarckians and has been repeatedly explained away by Darwinians. So many troglobites are relicts of formerly widespread faunas that Charles Darwin (1859) drew attention to this fact in "Origin of Species," and Rene Jeannel entitled his semipopular book on biospeleology "Les Fossiles Vivants des Cavernes" (1943). The alternating glacial and interglacial climates of the Pleistocene were unquestionably influential in this situation, the progenitors of existing troglobites having survived in the more equable microclimate of caves while their respective species became extinct at the surface.

The alternating glacial and interglacial climates of the Pleistocene were unquestionably influential in this situation, the progenitors of existing troglobites having survived in the more equable microclimate of caves while their respective species became extinct at the surface. Cave faunas apparently include both thermophilic and cryophilic components (Vandel, 1964), but the latter certainly predominate in caves of the temperate zones. Discontinuous habitats have attracted the attention of evolutionary biologists whenever it has been discovered that a multiplicity of closely similar, often allopatric species occur in them.

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